Back to Top
  • WHAT IS FAMILY LAW?

    Divorce / Child Custody / Adoption / Paternity

ISSUES AFFECTING THE FAMILY UNIT

Family law is a broad category of legal practice. It refers to the court procedures and regulations surrounding issues with the family unit, such as divorce, child custody, adoption, and more. Its primary focus is on resolving or mediating problems that commonly affect family relationships. While many family issues can be solved independently by the parties directly involved, some issues can’t be solved independently and must be handled in court.

WHEN DIVORCE IS INEVITABLE

In cases of divorce, family law helps determine how marital property and spousal support are divided. Each partner involved in a divorce case hires an attorney to represent him or her in court. Spousal support is not required in every situation, but it is often court ordered when one spouse is left without a source of income after a sudden divorce.




Child Custody and Child Support


When a couple, whether married or not, decides they no longer want to be together, a family law court will have to determine child custody and child support arrangements. In some cases, one parent may get full custody of the children. In other cases, custody may be split between both parents partially or equally. Each new single parent will have their family law attorneys represent them during the child custody battle with their ex-spouse.





Foster Care and Adoption


Adopting a child is a complicated process that has many variables involved. Family law governs the process of adoption. Laws and regulations regarding adoption vary based on the state in which the adoption is filed, as well as the state or country the adopted child is coming from. Regulations further differ based on the type of adoption taking place.


A MATTER OF PATERNITY

Paternity is yet another family matter that falls under the wide umbrella of family law. In some cases, fathers may file paternity cases to have more involvement in their child’s life. Mothers often file paternity cases to prove that an absent partner is the father of a child and is legally responsible for child support. If you’re dealing with unresolved family issues, family law may offer a solution.